Why does Apple Vision Pro come in such a huge box?

Macworld

In the days leading up to a major Apple launch–and they don’t come much bigger than Vision Pro, at least in long-term significance—there’s a tendency for the tech press to fixate on any and all details, no matter how trivial. And right now, that detail is the size of the box which Vision Pro comes in.

Writing for MacRumors Monday, senior editor Hartley Charlton reports that the site has spotted Vision Pro’s packaging in an Apple employee training video, and posts a 3D render of it next to the headset for size comparison purposes. And it’s fair to say that the box is bigger than we’ve grown used to for Apple products. The “viewing” angle of the render is tricky, but it seems like at least six headsets could be fitted into the cardboard immensity—and gives the impression that you’re getting quite a lot for your $3,499.

And you are. The large box shouldn’t be a huge surprise, because the headset isn’t the only thing that needs to fit in the box. Check out the “What’s in the Box” section of the pre-order page and you’ll see that it contains a light seal, two light seal cushions, two different bands (Solo Knit Band and Dual Loop Band), a cover, the external battery, a power adapter and cable, and a special-edition Polishing Cloth. That’s on top of the usual documentation and internal packaging to make sure things don’t bump into each other and cause damage in transit. Frankly, it’s amazing the box isn’t even bigger.

That’s not to say that size doesn’t matter, or that Apple won’t be working hard to make the packaging smaller; one of Tim Cook’s great successes as CEO (and before, when he ran operations) has been to make the company’s logistics and shipping as efficient as possible. Environmental concerns may have been the pretext when headphones and chargers were removed from iPhone boxes, but lowering shipping costs will have been a major factor too. When the company is selling just 200,000 units, the weight of individual packages is less of a concern, but it will want to slim things down for the product’s hoped-for future as a mainstream success.

Still, in the grand scheme of things, this remains a triviality. It will be far more important for Apple to slim down the headset itself, and save us all from sore necks.

Virtual Reality

​Macworld Macworld

In the days leading up to a major Apple launch–and they don’t come much bigger than Vision Pro, at least in long-term significance—there’s a tendency for the tech press to fixate on any and all details, no matter how trivial. And right now, that detail is the size of the box which Vision Pro comes in.

Writing for MacRumors Monday, senior editor Hartley Charlton reports that the site has spotted Vision Pro’s packaging in an Apple employee training video, and posts a 3D render of it next to the headset for size comparison purposes. And it’s fair to say that the box is bigger than we’ve grown used to for Apple products. The “viewing” angle of the render is tricky, but it seems like at least six headsets could be fitted into the cardboard immensity—and gives the impression that you’re getting quite a lot for your $3,499.

And you are. The large box shouldn’t be a huge surprise, because the headset isn’t the only thing that needs to fit in the box. Check out the “What’s in the Box” section of the pre-order page and you’ll see that it contains a light seal, two light seal cushions, two different bands (Solo Knit Band and Dual Loop Band), a cover, the external battery, a power adapter and cable, and a special-edition Polishing Cloth. That’s on top of the usual documentation and internal packaging to make sure things don’t bump into each other and cause damage in transit. Frankly, it’s amazing the box isn’t even bigger.

That’s not to say that size doesn’t matter, or that Apple won’t be working hard to make the packaging smaller; one of Tim Cook’s great successes as CEO (and before, when he ran operations) has been to make the company’s logistics and shipping as efficient as possible. Environmental concerns may have been the pretext when headphones and chargers were removed from iPhone boxes, but lowering shipping costs will have been a major factor too. When the company is selling just 200,000 units, the weight of individual packages is less of a concern, but it will want to slim things down for the product’s hoped-for future as a mainstream success.

Still, in the grand scheme of things, this remains a triviality. It will be far more important for Apple to slim down the headset itself, and save us all from sore necks.

Virtual Reality 

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